Autobiographies

A Sketch of the Life of Charles Andrew Hickenlooper (1862) As Told to His Daughter Della

Born in Salt Lake City, Utah, January 23, 1862, the second son and third child of Ann Ham and Bishop William H . Hickenlooper, as told to his daughter Della.

Like Nephi of old, I can say I was born of goodly parents. Owing to their teachings, and the tact and foresight of my father’s second wife, Aunt Sarah or “Aunty” as we called her, I am largely indebted for my faith in the Gospel and for my desire to do right as a boy. They taught honesty, integrity, charity to others faults, liberality, patience and virtue, in their daily lives as well as by precept.

Melva Hickenlooper (1907)

As Nephi of old, I was born of goodly parents and the youngest in a family of nine children. My parents are Charles Andrew and Medora Blanchard Hickenlooper. I was born 18 Feb 1907 in Pleasant View, Weber County, Utah.

My mother told me that Aunt Eliza Reese (the town’s aunt) remarked when she saw me, that I was the prettiest of all of Dora’s babies. Mother told me this to bolster ego or self-image as I considered myself the “ugly duckling” of the family.

Elizabeth Bocock (1837)

My maiden name was Elizabeth Bocock, my father’s name was William Bocock and my mother's maiden name was Sarah Brough. I was born at Tinsley Bar near Sheffield, Yorkshire, England on May 11, 1837. My parents were in comfortable circumstances and gave me a good common education, intending to send me to a Normal School to educate me for a teacher, but my father died when I was eleven years old (13 May 1848) and mother died four years afterward (8 Mar 1852).

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After my parents death, my sisters and myself continued to keep the Toll Gate where we lived.

Jane Johnson Autobiographical Sketch

I, Jane Johnston Black, was born June 11, 1801, at Lombag, Antrim County, Ireland, the daughter of Daniel Johnston and Margaret Chambers. I lived at my father’s house until I was sixteen years of age when my father died, I was then called as a local preacher on the same circuit that my father had traveled, he being a Wesleyan Methodist. I remained in that position until I was over twenty years of age, and made William Black’s house my home, as he was my guardian. I lived there until my marriage to his son, William, who had been away serving as a soldier in the British Army.

Benjamin Lynn Mathews (1892)

I was born at Beaver, Utah, December 26, 1892, in a two-story black, rock house located four blocks west of main street and one block north of the highway which leads to Milford, Utah. I was a third child of Thomas Cartwright and Mary Ellen Eyre Mathews. Our first home was a pink rock house, one block east of the place I was born.

Thomas Mathews (1917)

Not sure when written. Tells of his growing up, church activity and his family life.

I am the second son of Benjamin Lynn Mathews and Esther Black. I was born in Grandfather Black’s home at Coyote (Antimony), Utah, on 6 December 1917. Shortly after I was born I became sick with the influenza that was sweeping the country in 1918; but, with the loving care of Mother and Grandmother Black and the blessings of the Lord, I recovered with no permanent effects.

The Mission Home

The term Mission Training Center was not the name they used for missionary training when I was a missionary. I think it was called the Mission Home. The name does not matter as long as my readers know what I’m talking about.