Charles Andrew Hickenlooper (1862)

Events

Birth23 Jan 1862 at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Death20 Oct 1938 at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Burial20 Oct 1938 at North Ogden, Weber, Utah, USA

Tagged content

Stories

Two Spiritual Experiences of Charles Andrew Hickenlooper (1862)

Set down in his 71st year by Charles Andrew Hickenlooper in Salt Lake City, 1 February 1933.

Re-typed from a xeroxed typescript copy 28 July 2004.

Experience One

During the year 1893, my nephews George and Joseph Wade became very sick with typhoid fever. Their brothers John, Moses, and Andrew, and a sister, Sarah Jane Quinlan, had all died just a short time before with that dreaded disease.

William Crandall and I were staying with them one night. The doctor came during the evening. Before leaving, he told us that Joseph could not live, that there was no chance whatever for him, and that George had about one chance in one hundred.

About two a.m. George seemed to be in great pain and distress. We administered to him. While our hands were upon his head, I felt as if an electrical current entered the ends of my fingers and ran to my shoulders. When we removed our hands, he brightened up and said, “Uncle Charley, the pain left my head and went into your fingers, and it is all gone now.”

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Spiritual Experience of Charles Hickenlooper (1862)

Set down in his 71st year by Charles Andrew Hickenlooper in Salt Lake City, 1 February 1933.
Re-typed from a xeroxed typescript copy 28 July 2004.

The following incident is one of the most faith-promoting experiences I have ever had. It is, in fact, a miracle. I have made it a matter of prayer that I might set forth the incident just as I experienced it and that I might tell it truthfully and exactly as it actually happened. It is with the thought that some of my own descendants or any others who may happen to read this may be strengthened in their faith that I set it down in writing.

Not many people ever have the peculiar experience of coming back to this earth and living again once they have left it. This is, however, the experience of Dr. LeRoy Cowles, who is now a professor at the University of Utah.

LeRoy was living with his parents on their farm at Harrisville in Weber County, some six miles northwest of Ogden, Utah. His father’s farm and my own were very close together, being about a half mile apart, and our families were very close friends.

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Funeral Talk for Medora Blanchard (1866)

Talk given by Brother. C. Jorgensen

My dear Brothers, Sisters, and Friends, I feel highly honored this afternoon being asked by the family to say a few words on this solemn occasion.

About nine years have passed away since I moved into the Second Ward,’ just across the street from Brother and Sister Hickenlooper. They were the first to call upon us. Brother Hickenlooper made a special visit to see who the neighbors were, and I certainly appreciated his visit. I soon became acquainted with his worthy companion. They made their home my home, and made me feel that I belonged to the Second Ward, I supposed that a Sunday of two might have passed away before I attended church had it not been for meeting these worthy people. Brother Hickenlooper invited me to come out to meeting and meet our splendid Bishopric and the good people of the Second Ward. I learned to love them very much. It was not long until I became active in again in Church work. I have enjoyed myself in the ward exceedingly.

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A Missionary Experience of Charles A. Hickenlooper (1862)

In relating the following incident, which took place in Sawdust, Tennessee, shortly after entering the missionary field, I realize the dark pessimistic side of the situation may tend to overshadow the really important thing – the joy and thanksgiving that comes to the soul when one realizes that God watches over and opens the way for us when we are in His service and trust to His care. Traveling without purse or scrip as I did the entire time of my missionary work, I found it necessary to place my trust in my Heavenly Father’ and when I did so in faith and humility, the Lord provided for my needs.

When I first entered the missionary field, I was assigned to work in Murray County, Tennessee, with W. T. Ogden. Brother Ogden, a young man about twenty-one years of age, had been in the field about sixteen months when I arrived and was assigned to work with him. He was a very faithful and energetic elder. President Kimball specifically told us to canvass Columbia City, the County Seat of Murray County, before going into the country districts. Columbia City had a population of about ten thousand people and was one of the most beautiful cities that I saw in Tennessee.

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History of the Hickenlooper Family

By Della H. Barker

According the family tradition, the Hickenloopers were among those persecuted for their religious beliefs in Wurttemberg, Germany; they were put aboard a raft and floated down the Rhine River to Holland. At any rate they sailed from Holland-Amsterdam, on the ship “Peggy” 16 October 1754(Pa.B Vol. 1 p.637)Vol. II contains the orginal signatures, in facsimile, of all the passengers. My ancestor signed his name Andreas Heckenleib. It is spelled the same when he took the Oath Of Allegiance to the king. (Pa. 84Vol. 17 p 440), and also in the book “30,000 names of immigrants in Pa.” by Rupp. This name is found in various spellings in the counties of Goeppinger, Wurttemberg, and Waeschenbeuren, and spelled Heckenlaible, Hoeckenlaible, Huckenlaibe, as well as Heckenleib, as above. In the first census of the United States in 1790 he is listed from Manallan township, York County, Pennsylvania, and name is Andrew Hickenloover. His wife’s name was Katherine and from this union came Andres, Jr., Adam, George, Mary, Ann, and Margaret. They were Luthean.

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[Charles] Hickenlooper (1862) Reports Upon Boise Fair

Salt Lake Sept. 23,

C. A. Hickenlooper addressed the meeting of the Salt Lake County Horticultural society at its regular monthly meeting held. In the city and county building yesterday, M. Christopherson presided.

Mr.Hickenlooper spoke of his visit to the Boise fair, as a delegate from Weber countv. He said Utah had an exhibit of fruit at the fair that attracted wide interest and a great deal of favorable comment. Practically all of the fruit on exhibition, he said, was from trees that had been well and properly sprayed and carefully pruned and practically all of the credits were given for fruit in that class. Praise was given for the courteous and generous treatment given by the Boise people- Mr. Hickenlooper spoke interestingly in telling of his experience in fruit culture and giving the members of the society the results of some of his experiments. The society rendered a vote of thanks to Mr. Hickenlooper.

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Florence Hickenlooper Jensen tells about her father Charles Hickenlooper's mission

Grandma Jensen liked to tell this story about her father’s mission. At the time Grandma was a little girl, missionaries weren’t called when they were young men of 19 or 20. Missionaries were most often married men with families. In the summer of 1895, Grandpa Charles Hickenlooper received a mission call to the Southern States. He had to leave his wife and family of five little children with a sixth child due to arrive in a few months. Grandma Medora Blanchard Hickenlooper and the children, William, Luella, Della, our grandmother Florence, and little brother Ray had to take over running the farm and the children had to work hard. They also worried about Grandpa Hickenlooper. The missionaries carried very little money – that’s what “without purse or scrip” means – and they depended on the kindness of strangers to give them a meal, let them wash up, and put them up for the night even if it meant sleeping in the barn. Mormons were yankees and outsiders and some of the elders had been mobbed and two had been lynched. But Grandpa Hickenlooper was safe. He carried a picture of his children that he showed to the people he met.Read more →

The First Cars

When Dad and I were in Robertson, Wyoming, Mr. Slade from the Studebaker business in Lyman sold us our first car – a 1916 new Dodge. The top came down, a roadster. He drove it to Robertson for us – then I drove the car back to Lyman to take him home. Henry went but didn’t want to drive it. [We] returned to Pleasant View with the car – very few cars in Pleasant View. Probably the first car in Pleasant View was owned by [my father] Charles A. Hickenlooper who had a company-furnished car. It was a two-seated car. “We couldn’t use it to go to stake conference because it caused too much talk, and the other thing was that one must not go riding on Sunday. We then had to take the street car [from Pleasant View] into the Ogden Tabernacle [at 20th and Washington Blvd.].” [That’s where the temple is now.]

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Hickenlooper Family Stories

TODO For ease of reading/finding, the stories here should be split up into separates pages or discarded if they duplicate already existing content. -- Kyle

Compiled for the Henry Lewis Jensen — Florence Hickenlooper Family Reunion of July 7, 2006.

Jean Bergen Ohai, July 2006

12 July 2006, Florence Hickenlooper Jensen’s Flower Garden added

13 July 2006, Florence Hickenlooper Jensen’s Preliminaries to a Fried Chicken Dinner added

From Aunt Jean:

This is for the great grandchildren and the great-great grandchildren.

I loved my grandparents and I loved my uncles and aunts. I hope that you great grandchildren and the great-great grandchildren will love them, too.

Family stories are powerful. We grew up with many of them and I collected or searched for the rest of them. Some are funny, some are sad, and all are interesting. All will help you get acquainted with your family and know those who came before you. Tell them to your children.

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Biographies

Biography of Charles Andrew Hickenlooper (1862) from the Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia

Taken from the "Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia - Volume 2 - Biographies"

Hickenlooper, Charles A., Bishop of the Pleasant View Ward, Weber Stake, Utah, was born Jan. 23, 1862, in Salt Lake City, Utah, the son of Bishop William H. Hickenlooper of the Sixth Ward. He was baptized when about eight years old; ordained a Deacon Dec. 22, 1877; ordained a Priest Dec. 19, 1879; removed with his mother to Pleasant View, Weber county, where he subsequently labored as a Ward teacher, Sunday school teacher, etc. He was ordained an Elder Dec. 9, 1883, by William Jones; married Medora Blanchard Dec. 13, 1883; labored for years as president of the Ward Y. M. M. I. A.; ordained a Seventy Jan. 27, 1884, by John Ellis; filled a mission to the Southern States in 1895–97; ordained a High Priest and set apart as second counselor to Bishop E. W. Wade July 19, 1897, by Lewis W. Shurtliff, and became Bishop of the Pleasant View Ward Feb. 24, 1901.

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Charles Hickenlooper (1862) -- Biographical Sketch Taken from the Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia

Hickenlooper, Charles A., Bishop of the Pleasant View Ward, Weber Stake, Utah, was born Jan. 23, 1862, in Salt Lake City, Utah, the son of Bishop William H. Hickenlooper of the Sixth Ward. He was baptized when about eight years old; ordained a Deacon Dec. 22, 1877; ordained a Priest Dec. 19, 1879; removed with his mother to Pleasant View, Weber county, where he subsequently labored as a Ward teacher, Sunday school teacher, etc. He was ordained an Elder Dec. 9, 1883, by William Jones; married Medora Blanchard Dec. 13, 1883; labored for years as president of the Ward Y. M. M. I. A.; ordained a Seventy Jan. 27, 1884, by John Ellis; filled a mission to the Southern States in 1895–97; ordained a High Priest and set apart as second counselor to Bishop E. W. Wade July 19, 1897, by Lewis W. Shurtliff, and became Bishop of the Pleasant View Ward Feb. 24, 1901.

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Obituaries

Charles A. Hickenlooper (1862)

10–23–38

Charles Andrew Hickenlooper, 76, former Weber county fruit tree inspector and member of the Utah state board of horticulture, died Thursday at 8:20 a. m. while at work at the Glen Key and Tennis shop, 234 South State street, of a heart attack.

Funeral services will be conducted Sunday at 12:30 p. m. in the Second L. D. S. ward chapel.

He was born in Salt Lake City, January 23, 1862, a son of William H. and Ann Ham Hickenlooper, and was a former bishop of the Pleasant View L. D. S. ward in Weber county.

Surviving are three sons, Ray C. Hickenlooper of Ogden, Merl H. Hickenlooper of Burbank, Cal., and Glen Hickenlooper of Salt Lake City; four daughters, Mrs. William Packham of Fairfield, Cal.; Mrs. Fred Barker of North Ogden, Mrs. Henry L. Jensen of Pleasant View and Miss Melva Hickenlooper of Salt Lake City.

Friends may call at the family home, 619 Park street, Saturday evening and Sunday prior to services. Burial will be in North Ogden cemetery.

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Autobiographies

A Sketch of the Life of Charles Andrew Hickenlooper (1862) As Told to His Daughter Della

Born in Salt Lake City, Utah, January 23, 1862, the second son and third child of Ann Ham and Bishop William H . Hickenlooper, as told to his daughter Della.

Like Nephi of old, I can say I was born of goodly parents. Owing to their teachings, and the tact and foresight of my father’s second wife, Aunt Sarah or “Aunty” as we called her, I am largely indebted for my faith in the Gospel and for my desire to do right as a boy. They taught honesty, integrity, charity to others faults, liberality, patience and virtue, in their daily lives as well as by precept.

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